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SJAM’s History Department has a diverse range of exciting courses that deal not only with the past, but with current societies. Anthropology, Psychology, Sociology, Law, Genocide Studies, Philosophy and Economics make up a significant portion of our course offerings. Our teachers attempt to deliver History and Contemporary Studies in a dynamic and relevant way for today’s students by analyzing the link between the past and present.

To view courses offered under Canadian & World Studies – History, CLICK HERE.

GRADE 11

HSP3CI (Introduction to Anthropology, Psychology & Sociology, College)

Anthropology is the science of human origins and culture, Psychology is the science of the mind and Sociology is the science of society. In this course we examine theories relating to all three of these subjects and then apply them to “real-world” problems.

Topics include Nature (genes) vs. Nurture (your life experiences), personality, dreams, famous social scientists, psychological disorders, abuse, defense mechanisms, culture and subcultures (Hippies, Skinheads, Teenagers, Prostitutes, Hip-Hop), violence, substance abuse, serial killers and much more.  Prerequisite:  NONE.

Units of Study

  • Unit 1: Introduction to the Social Sciences
  • Unit 2: Self and Others
  • Unit 3: Social Structures and Institutions
  • Unit 4: Social Organization and Social Issues

HSP3UI (Introduction to Anthropology, Psychology & Sociology, University)

Anthropology is the science of human origins, psychology is the science of the mind, and sociology is the science of society.  In this course we examine theories relating to all three of these disciplines and then apply them to “real-world” problems. Topics include Nature (genes) vs. Nurture (your life experiences), personality, dreams, famous social scientists, psychological disorders, abuse, defense mechanisms, culture and subcultures (Hippies, Skinheads, Teenagers, Prostitutes, Hip-Hop), violence, substance abuse, serial killers, the “gangsta” rap debate and much more.

We read the case study Sybil, the true story of a woman who developed multiple personalities after severe childhood abuse before “reintegrating” with psychoanalysis.  Field Trip: Centre for Addiction and Mental Health in Toronto. Prerequisite:  CHC2DI or ENG2DI.

Units of Study

  • Unit 1: Introduction to the Social Sciences
  • Unit 2: Self and Others
  • Unit 3: Social Structures and Institutions
  • Unit 4: Social Organization and Social Issues

Assessment & Evaluation:

  • Tests, Assignments, Essay, Book Review, Seminar, Exam

GRADE 12

HSB4UI (Challenge & Change in Society, University)

This course examines the theories and methodologies used in anthropology, psychology and sociology to investigate and explain shifts in knowledge, attitudes, beliefs, and behaviour and their impact on society. Students will analyze cultural, social, and biological patterns in human societies, looking at ways in which those patterns change over time. Students will also explore the ideas of classical and contemporary social theorists, and apply those ideas to the analysis of contemporary trends.

Topics covered include the human behaviour experiments, suicide, prejudice and discrimination, Sigmund Freud, gangs, cults and new religious movements, theories of social change, conformity and alienation, popular culture, globalization, hate crimes, and music and social change.  Field trip: The Multicultural Toronto Neighbourhoods Tour (Kensington Market, Chinatown, Little Italy, The Danforth). Prerequisite: Any Gr. 11 or 12 U/M level course in Canadian and World Studies, English, or Social Sciences and Humanities.

Units of Study

  • Unit 1: Social Science Theories
  • Unit 2: Social Change
  • Unit 3: Social Trends
  • Unit 4: Social Challenges

Assessment & Evaluation:

  • Tests, Assignments, Essay, Project, Exam

HZT4UI (Philosophy—Questions and Theories, University)

This is an introductory philosophy course for any student who has pondered any of life’s “big” questions.  This is not a course designed only for the social science-minded. We examine logic and science, while also investigating religion, reality, learning, ethics, and beauty.  Core components include: debating, discussion, reading, and writing. If you have either an opinion or want an opinion on any of these topics, this course will help you to attain the appropriate justification.  Remember in philosophy there are rarely right and wrong answers; only those which satisfy you. Prerequisite: Any Gr. 11 or 12 U/M level course in Canadian and World Studies, English, or Social Sciences and Humanities.