HistoryBanner

SJAM’s History Department has a diverse range of exciting courses that deal not only with the past, but with current societies. Anthropology, Psychology, Sociology, Law, Genocide Studies, Philosophy and Economics make up a significant portion of our course offerings. Our teachers attempt to deliver History and Contemporary Studies in a dynamic and relevant way for today’s students by analyzing the link between the past and present.

For more courses offered by the History Department,
see
Native Studies or Social Sciences & Humanities – History

GRADE 10

CHC2PB (Canadian History since World War I, Fast Forward)

This course explores some of the pivotal events and experiences that have influenced the development of Canada’s identity as a nation from World War I to the present.  By examining how the country has responded to economic, social and technological changes and how individuals and groups have contributed to Canadian culture and society during this period, students will develop their ability to make connections between historical and current events.  Students will have opportunities to formulate questions, locate information, develop informed opinions, and present ideas about the central issues and events of the period. Prerequisite:  NONE.

Units of Study

  • Unit 1:  Turn of the Century and WWI
  • Unit 2:  From Prosperity to Despair:  The 1920s and 1930
  • Unit 3:  WWII
  • Unit 4:  Stability, Tension and Suspicion: 1945 – 1967
  • Unit 5:  The Turbulent Years: 1968 – 1983
  • Unit 6:  New Realities: 1984 – Present

 

CHC2PI (Canadian History Since World War I, Applied)

This course explores some of the pivotal events and experiences that have influenced the development of Canada’s identity as a nation from World War I to the present. By examining how the country has responded to economic, social, and technological changes and how individuals and groups have contributed to Canadian culture and society during this period, students will develop their ability to make connections between historical and current events.

This course will be focused around a guiding question, reinforced by an investigation of five thematic critical challenge questions dealing with major threads in Canadian History. Students will develop the ability to devise criteria with which to analyze an issue, and then make reasoned judgments based on historical evidence. Prerequisite:  NONE.

Guiding Question:  Has Canadian identity changed for the better since 1914?

Critical Challenges:

  • French-English Relations:  Have French Canadians been treated unjustly by an English-dominated Canada?
  • War and Peace:  Is Canadian identity shaped more by fighting war or maintaining peace?
  • International Relations :  Historically, has Canada relied on Britain and the United States to provide leadership in global affairs?
  • Social Justice and Change:  Although the Canadian government prides itself on upholding human rights, has its history truly reflected this image?
  • Economic:  Has Canada’s economic evolution positively or negatively impacted Canadians?

Units of Study:

  • Unit 1:  Turn of the Century and WWI
  • Unit 2:  From Prosperity to Despair:  The 1920s and 1930s
  • Unit 3:  WWII
  • Unit 4:  Stability, Tension and Suspicion: 1945 – 1967
  • Unit 5:  The Turbulent Years: 1968 – 1983
  • Unit 6:  New Realities: 1984 – Present

 

CHC2DI (Canadian History since World War I, Academic)

This course explores the local, national, and global forces that have shaped Canada’s national identity from World War I to present. Students will investigate the challenges presented by economic, social, and technological changes and explore the contributions of individuals and groups to Canadian culture and society during this period. Students will use critical-thinking and communication skills to evaluate various interpretations of the issues and events of the period and to present their own points of view.

This course will be focused around a guiding question, reinforced by an investigation of five thematic critical challenge questions dealing with major threads in Canadian History. Students will develop the ability to devise criteria with which to analyze an issue, and then make reasoned judgments based on historical evidence.  Prerequisite:  NONE.

Guiding Question:  Has Canadian identity changed for the better since 1914?

Critical Challenges:

  • French-English Relations:  Have French Canadians been treated unjustly by an English-dominated Canada?
  • War and Peace:  Is Canadian identity shaped more by fighting war or maintaining peace?
  • International Relations :  Historically, has Canada relied on Britain and the United States to provide leadership in global affairs?
  • Social Justice and Change:  Although the Canadian government prides itself on upholding human rights, has its history truly reflected this image?
  • Economic:  Has Canada’s economic evolution positively or negatively impacted Canadians?

Units of Study:

  • Unit 1:  Turn of the Century and WWI
  • Unit 2:  From Prosperity to Despair:  The 1920s and 1930s
  • Unit 3:  WWII
  • Unit 4:  Stability, Tension and Suspicion: 1945 – 1967
  • Unit 5:  The Turbulent Years: 1968 – 1983
  • Unit 6:  New Realities: 1984 – Present

 

CHV2OB (Civics and Citizenship, Fast Forward – 1/2 Credit Course paired with GLC2OB)

This course explores what it means to be an informed, participating citizen in a democratic society.  Students will learn about the elements of democracy and the meaning of democratic citizenship in local, national and global contexts.  In addition, students will learn about social change, examine decision-making processes in Canada, explore their own and others’ beliefs and perspective on civic questions and learn how to think and act critically and creatively about public issues. Prerequisite:  NONE.

Units of Study:

Unit 1: Issues and Ideas

  • Forms of leadership and government
  • How governments are created

Unit 2: The Canadian Context

  • The Parliamentary system
  • Canadian political beliefs
  • Law in Canada

Unit 3:  Global Perspectives

 

CHV2OH (Civics and Citizenship, Open – 1/2 Credit Course Paired with GLC2OH)

This course explores what it means to be an informed, participating citizen in a democratic society.  Students will learn about the elements of democracy and the meaning of democratic citizenship in local, national and global contexts.  In addition, students will learn about social change, examine decision-making processes in Canada, explore their own and others’ beliefs and perspective on civic questions and learn how to think and act critically and creatively about public issues.  Prerequisite:  NONE.

Units of Study:

Unit 1: Issues and Ideas

  • Forms of leadership and government
  • How governments are created

Unit 2: The Canadian Context

  • The Parliamentary system
  • Canadian political beliefs
  • Law in Canada

Unit 3:  Global Perspectives

 


GRADE 11

CHA3UI (American History, University/College – NOT CURRENTLY AVAILABLE)

How does a tiny British colony become the most influential nation in the history of the world?  Does the U.S. free nations from dictators or invade for its own interests? This course examines the people and the events:  the Salem Witch Trials, the American Revolution, the Civil War, slavery, the World Wars, the Cold War, Vietnam and the Civil Rights movement, right up to the invasion of Iraq.  No nation is more controversial than the United States, and this course looks at the facts. Students will learn about differing interpretations of the past and will come to understand the importance of chronology and cause-and-effect relationships. They will continue to develop their skills in creating and supporting a thesis, conducting research and analysis, and effective communication of the results of their inquiries.  Prerequisite:  CHC2PI or CHC2DI.

Course Content/Structure:

Unit 1: Europe Encounters America (1492 – 1763)

Unit 2: Birth of a Nation: The American Revolution (1763 – 1791)

Unit 3: Growing Pains: The Young Republic (1792 -1850)

Unit 4: America Tears Itself Apart: The Civil War (1850 – 1865)

Unit 5: Birth of Modern America (1865 – 1918)

Unit 6: The New World Power (1919 – 1945)

Unit 7: The American Empire (1945 – Present)

Unit 8: Whither America? September 11 and Beyond

Assessment & Evaluation:

  • Tests, Assignments, Essay, Seminar Presentation, Final Exam

 

CHG33I (Genocide and Crimes Against Humanity, University/College) – not offered 2020-2021

This course investigates examples of genocide in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries in Armenia, the Holocaust, and Rwanda. Students will investigate the terms genocide, crimes against humanity, and war crimes, and explore them through the lens of historical analysis. Students will examine identity formation and how “in groups” and “out groups” are created, including analysis of how bias, stereotypes, prejudice, and discrimination impact on various groups.  Students will also use critical-thinking skills to evaluate the ways in which active citizens may empower themselves to stop future genocides.  Prerequisite:  CHC2PI or CHC2DI.

 

CHW3MI (World History to the end of the 15th Century, University/College)

This course covers the rise and the fall of great civilizations.  Topics include war, corruption, scandals and love affairs. The units covered include Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece, Rome and Medieval Europe.  Other civilizations that can be studied include ancient India, China, Japan, the Aztecs, Incas and Mayans. Field trip: the Royal Ontario Museum (ROM).  Prerequisite:  CHC2PI or CHC2DI.

Units of Study:

  • Unit 1:  The Journey to Civilization (Prehistory)
  • Unit 2:  First Civilizations of the Near East (Mesopotamia & Egypt)
  • Unit 3:  Mediterranean Civilizations (Greece & Rome) – From the Rise of the Hellenes to the Fall of the Romans
  • Unit 4:  Medieval World
  • Unit 5:  Seminar & Essay

Topics:  Islam, Ancient China, Ancient Japan, the Maya, the Inca, the Aztec, Ancient India, Vikings

 

CLU3MI (Canadian Law, University/College)

This course focuses on where our laws come from, our rights as Canadians, as well as a thorough investigation into our criminal justice system.  Several guest speakers of varying expertise visit our classes to tell of their experiences – experts such as: forensics, detectives, Crown Attorney, Defense Attorney, and ex-convicts have been known to make an appearance.  Each semester there is a field trip to Toronto to sit in on major current court cases. Knowing your rights iin your job place and civil law are two other units covered in this course. Students will use critical-thinking, inquiry, and communication skills to develop informed opinions on legal issues and apply this knowledge in a variety of ways and settings, including case analysis, legal research projects, mock trials and debates.  Prerequisite:  CHC2PI or CHC2DI.

Units of Study:

  • Unit 1: The History of Law and Fundamental Concepts
  • Unit 2:    Criminal Law – Part I  (What is a Crime?; Police Procedures: The Criminal Code)
  • Unit 3: Criminal Law – Part II   (The Pre-trial; The Courtroom; Trial Procedure; Punishment)
  • Unit 4: Civil Procedure and Tort Law
  • Unit 5: Family Law  (Marriage and Divorce; Children and the Law)

 


GRADE 12

CHY4UI (World History since the 15th Century, University)

This course examines how the powerful nations of Europe have dominated the world politically, economically and militarily from the 1500’s up to the present day.  Topics include the Renaissance, the Reformation, The French Revolution, Napoleon, Peter the Great, Nationalism and Imperialism, The Russian Revolution, Hitler, The Holocaust, Gandhi, Stalin, The Middle East and much more,.  This course helps us understand the most significant events in Western history, and how they have shaped the world we live in today. Field trip: The Holocaust Museum in Toronto and Survivor talks. Prerequisite:  Any Gr. 11 or 12 U/M level course in Canadian and World Studies, English, or Social Sciences and Humanities.

Units of Study:

  • Unit 1: Foundations and Institutions Challenged  1500 – 1715
  • Unit 2: An Age of Enlightenment and Revolution  1715 – 1815
  • Unit 3: Modern Europe  1815 – 1914
  • Unit 4: Between the World Wars  1917 – 1938
  • Unit 5: The New World Order – The Middle East

 

CLN4UI (Canadian and International Law, University)

This course examines the origins of our laws, debates the usefulness of our Charter, and investigates our criminal justice system.  What safeguards do we have in place to provide justice to our citizens? How are they ineffective and what can be done to make changes?  These questions are explored along with a critical look into our involvement in the international community. The procedures for designed and implementing international agreements are analyzed; the utility of international organizations such as the United Nations is also explored.  This course is designed for those who enjoy debating and discussing ideas surrounding many of Canada’s legal components. Prerequisite:  Any Gr. 11 or 12 U/M level course in Canadian and World Studies, English, or Social Sciences and Humanities.

Units of Study:

  • Unit 1:  Legal Heritage
  • Unit 2:  Rights and Freedoms
  • Unit 3:  Criminal Law
  • Unit 4:  International Law
  • Unit 5:  Environmental Law

 

CPW4UI (Canadian and World Politics, University)

This course explores various perspectives on issues in Canadian and world politics. Students will explore political decision making and ways in which individuals, stakeholder groups, and various institutions, including governments, multinational corporations, and non-governmental organizations, respond to and work to address domestic and international issues. Prerequisite:  Any Gr. 11 or 12 U/M level course in Canadian and World Studies, English, or Social Sciences and Humanities.